Home

User login

, after login or registration your account will be connected.


May 18, 2015 - 5:51pm
May 17, 2015 - 4:48pm
May 13, 2015 - 6:54pm
May 4, 2015 - 7:08pm
April 30, 2015 - 11:22am

Social Media



Poker Radio

High Roller Radio
High Roller Radio
2 to 1 You'll Love It!

High Roller Radio
House of Cards
by Ashley Adams
 

Who's online

There are currently 0 users and 14 guests online.

David Chicotsky

Let the Games Begin

By: David "The Maven" Chicotsky
Getting Off to a Good Start Early in a Tournament

The age old question, "Should I play loose or tight early in a tournament?" - has stumped many.

In massive field tournaments, like we'll witness here in Las Vegas in the near future, there's a premium for accruing chips. Quite simply, the only people that make it to the final table of these tournaments are the players that consistently chip-accumulated. If we know going into these massive-field tournaments we'll need to build an incredibly large stack, it's important to start accumulating right from the beginning.

Your rating: None Average: 1 (1 vote)

Play Strong on the Button

By: David "The Maven" Chicotsky

 

Playing the button is an integral part of utilizing position at the poker table and it's an area of mystery to many. The reality is, the more confident you are with your game, the more hands you should be playing from this position. Words of caution: certain types of players are going to be less likely to "believe you" when you open (or re-raise) from the button, so you'll want to take that into account. If I have a very good player in the big blind when I'm on the button, I'm more likely to fold the majority of these spots - preferring to open up from other positions, into weaker blinds.

 

Your rating: None Average: 3 (2 votes)

Act on Poker Momentum

By: David "The Maven" Chicotsky
Slow Down to Speed Up

No votes yet

Early Tournament Tips

By: David "The Maven" Chicotsky
Set the Proper Tone Early in the Tournament

No votes yet

Work in More Raises Post-Flop

By: David "The Maven" Chicotsky

A raise can get you out of a tough spot - use it! 

Well it was an up and down week for me poker-wise. I won my first tournament of 2015 and made the final couple tables of a $300,000 guaranteed online tournament with over 1,200 entrants - which was nice, but a bit of a tease. I also made day 2 of the Venetian Main Event, but ended up calling a 4-bet with Ace-King against 99 and lost a big race. All and all I'm satisfied with how I played and will be playing a couple of the Wynn tournaments currently going on in Vegas. 

Your rating: None Average: 4 (1 vote)

Playing Out of Position Profitably

By: David "The Maven" Chicotsky

Plug this common poker leak through creative aggression

It's often said you earn what you don't lose and that's never been more true than when we are playing out of position. If there ever was a vulnerable area within the game of poker worth examining, this is it.

Remember, we don't have to be in the blinds to be out of position, entering pots in early position will also put us out of position on a regular basis. As we become more confident and skilled, we're able to open up our game out of position to a large degree.

The wider you're calling out of position, the wider you need to be willing to try and take down pots.

It's important to accentuate your poker stance when out of position: attack weakness even stronger and stay out of the way of strength to minimize any losses.

Your rating: None Average: 4 (2 votes)

The Particulars of ReRaising

by David “The Maven” Chicotsky

Reraising: it’s one of the least understood and most talked about poker activities. It can have a great upside if applied properly, and can create great peril if we’re simply over-inflating the pot. There are certain times in a tournament where it is advantageous, and other times when it is not. With (or against) the wrong chipstack, it can be devastating, though if we are within the proper parameters - it can work beautifully. For the purposes of today’s discussions, let’s talk about reraising from 15 to 50 big blinds.

As a tournament gets deep, one of the most apparent dilemmas that will certainly arise is (figuring out) when we should reraise all-in for our stack. Just as importantly, when should we put our opponents all-in for their stack (assuming we have the larger stack)? In general, the most basic parameters for reraising all-in for your stack (or your opponent’s stack) is betwee

Your rating: None Average: 3 (2 votes)

Tournament Tips: Playing From Early Position

by David “The Maven” Chicotsky

Many poker players approach tournaments the wrong way—not realizing that they will be essentially forced to “make plays” in order to keep up with the blind increases. Even if you are very successful and get away with murder at the table, you’re still going to get naturally shallowed out by the basic structure of the tournament. Tournaments, quite simply, revolve around stealing the blinds and antes. If you’re coming from a cash game background where you can sit around all night long peddling the nuts, this hard truth can work against you.

Some of the easiest and most obvious spots to steal from are on or around the button. Make sure you’re also going out of your way to re-steal from people raising in stealing position. It’s not enough to simply call from the big blind and hope you hit your hand. We’re forced to take an active role in defending the blinds by re-raising pre-flop as well as making moves against positional raisers and bettors postflop. The key is applying controlled aggression from many different positions with many types of pre-flop hands. Getting value out of marginal cards is critical—as we are only dealt premium and semi-premium hands very rarely.

No votes yet

Take the Information and Run With It

by David Chicotsky

We’ve all heard the phrase, “You can’t judge a book by its cover.” Well, in poker, in the vast majority of situations—you can. For the most part, players are very straightforward with their intentions, and when you have a read on someone (assuming you’re competent at gauging other players’ tendencies) you can usually use that info against your opponent in the future. In my previous articles I’ve highlighted how important it is to shift-gears, since playing the same way throughout a tournament makes us predictable. Despite this advice, be aware that the average player doesn’t shift gears enough.

 As a good training exercise to work on shifting gears, play a tournament and alternate between playing loose and tight every other level. Obviously there is no other logic behind this exercise than to get you comfortable switching gears. Normally, you’d want to switch gears during opportune times of a tournament, but in this case it’s easy enough to go from tight to loose at the start of each level. In tournament poker there is a perceived need to reconfirm information to help substantiate our thoughts on various opponents. I caution you against this...and here’s what I mean. If you think someone is loose, and you’re correct let’s say 80% of the time, you’re better off treating him accordingly right away (by re-raising the player on our right in this example). If you reconfirm this information by not re-raising and deciding to wait until the player has made another loose open, you’ll be that much more sure the player is loose (let’s make up a number, say 90% sure). The problem is, now this player realizes you’ve seen him play loose and can adjust accordingly. So even though you’ve increased your hypothetical certainty percentage from 80 to 90, the effectiveness of using that information against your opponent drops drastically. Essentially, the longer you wait to counter-act your opponent, the easier it is for your opponent to be conscious of this and adjust accordingly.

Your rating: None Average: 5 (1 vote)

Change Up Your Style

by David “The Maven” Chicotsky

Candy makers know that if they can get a person to like a certain type of candy as a kid, they’re much more likely to eat that brand of candy for the rest of their lives. Something similar occurs in poker - where players start out playing a certain style of poker and continue to play that style throughout their poker career. Just because something feels comfortable, doesn’t make it correct. In fact, in tournament poker, much of what initially seems correct is dead wrong.

The average poker player starts out overly tight, playing mostly semi-premium and premium hands. The sad truth is most of these players remain tight for years and years. It’s very important to be a chameleon at the table - adjusting to the table conditions (stack sizes, play of our opponents, time of the tournament, among other factors) on a constant basis. Other players start out loose (affectionately known as spewtards) and also follow along that path for far too long.

Playing poker is like driving a car; we go fast on the highway and slow in school zones. Just because we go fast on the highway, doesn’t mean we are a “fast” driver - it’s just part of the skill-set we need to efficiently get around town. Try not to mentally box yourself into a certain category of player. Let the game come to you and make the necessary adjustments along the way, since many other players won’t.

Your rating: None Average: 5 (1 vote)

Syndicate

Syndicate content

Poker Player Home | About Us | Contact Us

All material ©Poker Player All Rights Reserved unless materials are under existing copyright and said materials are the property of their respective copyright holders. Poker Player expressly disclaims any warranty relating to any content of any pages or any links provided on these pages.

 

 

 

 

 

Poker Player Newsletter

Subscribe to our
FREE POKER NEWSLETTER

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

 

Wendeen H. Eolis

World Series of Poker


September 4, 2014 - 9:31am
August 28, 2014 - 8:45am
August 25, 2014 - 8:44am
August 22, 2014 - 8:45am
August 19, 2014 - 9:04am